INDEX OF RESOURCES

How to reach your Senator or Representative

Department of Transportation
• Sending complaints to DOT about airline service
• Safety and security complaints
• Disability and discrimination complaints

TSA Traveler Advice
• 3-1-1-Rule
• List of prohibited items according to TSA
• Getting off the No-Fly List (Traveler Redress Inquiry Program)

Passport Rules

DOT Airline Statistics

Travel Problems in Europe EU rules

State Department Travel Warnings

Centers for Disease Control Health pages

DOT Denied Boarding/Bumping rules

Airline Luggage Rules and Regulations

Credit Card Problems

Customs and Border Protection
• Items that must be declared at the borders
• Foreign visitor information
• Know Before You Go booklet



 

Directory of Representatives

This page lists all the current U.S. Representatives.They are also referred to as a congressman or congresswoman, each representative is elected to a two-year term serving the people of a specific congressional district. The number of voting representatives in the House is fixed by law at no more than 435, proportionally representing the population of the 50 states. Currently, there are five delegates representing the District of Columbia, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Directory of Senators

Senators are elected every six years.


Department of Transportation

• DOT’s online consumer complaint form

• Airline service complaints and comments

• Safety and security complaints

• Disability and discrimination complaints


TSA Traveler advice

• TSA Complaint Form
If you feel that your civil right have been denied or that you were mishandled by TSA personnel, send your complaints directly to TSA through their website.

• TSA ID Requirements

• 3-1-1 Rule

• List of prohibited items according to TSA

• The Department of Homeland Security Traveler Redress Inquiry Program (DHS TRIP) is a single point of contact for individuals who have inquiries or seek resolution regarding difficulties they experienced during their travel screening at transportation hubs—like airports and train stations—or crossing U.S. borders, including: watch list issues, screening problems at ports of entry, situations where travelers believe they have been unfairly or incorrectly delayed, denied boarding or identified for additional screening at our nation’s transportation hubs.

DHS TRIP is part of an effort by the departments of State and Homeland Security to welcome legitimate travelers while still securing our country from those who want to do us harm.


Government Passport Rules
• How to apply for a passport

• How to renew a passort

• Passport processing fees

• How long does it take to get a passport?

• Expediting a passport


Department of Transportation (DOT) Airline Statistics
• Airline On-Time Statistics and Delay Causes

• Air Travel Consumer Report


Have a problem while traveling in Europe?

http://www.caa.co.uk/default.aspx?catid=2226

One of the more useful sections is “Resolving Travel Problems.” There, detailed, clearly worded explanations of what your rights are if your flight is delayed or cancelled, in terms of food and drink vouchers, refunds, and compensation is included.

In the European Union, regulations and what you’re entitled to depends on various factors, including the length of the flight and delay. The CAA runs through all the possibilities, and also does the same if you’re bumped off a flight because it is overbooked, or downgraded to a lower class of seat.

This is the information that you need if you’re faced with a less-than-helpful airline agent, or plan to make a complaint after you’ve flown.



U.S. State Department International Travel Information
• State Department Travel Warnings
• U.S. Department of State International Travel Registration


Center for Disease Control Health pages



• Vacination and Shot Requirements



Here is the basic denied boarding compensation rule

If the airline arranges substitute transportation that is scheduled to arrive at your destination between one and two hours after your original arrival time (between one and four hours on international flights), the airline must pay you an amount equal to 200% of your one-way fare to your final destination that day, with a $650 maximum.

If the substitute transportation is scheduled to get you to your destination more than two hours later (four hours internationally), or if the airline does not make any substitute travel arrangements for you, the compensation doubles (400% of your one-way fare, $1300 maximum).

The passenger can receive the compensation in cash or by check. Passengers do not have to accept airline scrip or vouchers if they are “involuntarily” bumped. If passengers “volunteer to be bumped,” their compensation is based on negotiation with the airline, which is bumping the passenger.

Click here for more details.


Airline Luggage Rules and Regulations

• Baggage charges and other airline ancillary fees

Alaska Airlines
Allegiant Air
American Airlines
Continental Airlines
Delta Air Lines
Frontier Airlines
Southwest Airlines
Spirit Airlines
United Airlines
US Airways


Credit Card Problems
Submit a complaint to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) about problems with credit cards


From Customs and Border Protection here is the definitive list of “Prohibited and Restricted Items” that must be declared at the borders.
• U.S. Customs Service Tips for International Travelers
• Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Crossing U.S. Borders
• Restricted items when entering the USA

For foreign visitors to the USA
DHS US-VISIT Traveler Information page for international travelers holding a non-U.S. passport or visa.
• FAQ for Visa Waiver Countries
• CBP Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA)

Customs and Border Protection Booklet — Know Before You Go
This online booklet is filled with important information about international travel.